Indigenous People Issues & Resources

August 15, 2008 at 6:25 pm | Posted in Education, Links, News, Organization | Leave a comment
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Thanks to a comment, two weeks ago I found this site, dedicated to indigenous people. It does not have information about all the tribes, but it keeps growing and its future seems promising!

Welcome to Indigenous Peoples Issues & Resource

Today, our world is experiencing a rapid decline in cultural diversity. One in five people in today’s world speak the same language: the Mandarin Chinese spoken by the largest single ethnic group in the world – the Han – whose 1.3 billion population represents 92 percent of the mainland Chinese population and 19 percent of the world’s population. Likewise, in India – the world’s second most populous country – there are 415 living, recognized languages, but the majority of people speak either Bengali or Hindi. Linguists recognize some 6,000 to 7,000 spoken languages, of which 5,000 or so are spoken by indigenous peoples who represent an estimated 6 percent of the world’s population.

Many of these people, and their language and culture, face a questionable future. The relatively rapid decline in language diversity parallels the decline in cultural diversity. These changes are due in part to the product of both historical relationships – imperialism, colonialism, Cold War economic development, and militarism – as well as cultural beliefs that rationalize or justify actions that serve the powerful at the cost of lands and livelihoods of indigenous peoples.

Indigenous Peoples Issues & Resources is a new site that is slowly developing. Our goal is to provide information and resources for those concerned about, and for, indigenous peoples around the world. We recognize that our actions in the West effect indigenous peoples in all parts of the world – the consequences of water diversion and hydroelectric energy projects, militarization, global and national events, and consolidation of natural resource access, and the like are all having an unprecedented impact on the world’s indigenous peoples. But we can do something.

It is our belief that cross-cultural communication and understanding – as well as easily accessible information and resources – is one of the keys to helping indigenous peoples maintain their language, culture, and identity. We hope that you also share this belief. Diversity is one of the strongest components to a healthy world. Together we can help and make a difference – from large to small.

I will dig into it later on. Looks promising, doesn’t it?

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… and a bit more about Kamchatka

August 1, 2008 at 9:43 pm | Posted in History, Siberia | Leave a comment
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I am having a very bad week, but I just wanted to post some info I found the other day,  when I was searching stuff from Kamchatka. This comes from Social Geography of Kamchatka:


The Koryak Autonomous Okrug is supposedly the homeland for Koryaks, who are traditionally from the Kamchatka Peninsula and the surrounding mainland. Actually Itelmens, Chukchi, and Evens have also been indigenous to the area for centuries as well.

Before the Soviets closed the region after World War II, Kamchatka was a regular stop for trading ships from the United States, Japan, Canada, and many European countries. When I visit the smaller villages, where most of the population is native, elders love to tell me about all the great stuff their parents bought from Americans. Men tell me about Winchesters, knives, and animal traps. Women sometimes show me tea kettles which have become family heirlooms.

Yeltsin opened the closed region in 1991, and it is quickly integrating into the Pacific Rim social and economic region. Local authorities prefer to keep a tight leash on foreigners, however, and travel around Kamchatka and the surrounding mainland (Magadan Oblast and Chukotka Okrug) is complicated, or worse, when you don’t have all your documents in order. No matter what the local consulate or embassy tells you, you will need the names of the major towns that you plan to visit on your visa. If you want a year-long, uninterrupted stay in Kamchatka, you need a multi-entry visa. Standard, three-month visas will be renewed only for three additional months in Kamchatka, no matter what. I recommend contacting my favorite Kamchatkan travel agent, KamchatIntour, for the latest information on travel in Kamchatka.

The Koryak Autonomous Region (Okrug) is located in the northern part of the peninsula and includes part of the surrounding mainland. It is about the size of Arizona with a population of about 35,000 people. Only one-fifth of those are Koryaks. Chukchi, Itel’mens, and Evens constitute the other native groups in the Regions, but Russians and Ukrainians make up over 75% of the total population. A steady emigration of non-natives back to their homes in the European part of the former Soviet Union has changed these number since the 1989 census, but reliable current statistics are not available.

The Region is divided into four districts or counties (rayoni): Tigil, Karaga, Oliutor, and Penzhina. The Regional capital, Palana, is the largest town with about 4000 people. Karaginskii District, capital Ossora, is the most populous and developed area. The northern districts of Penzhinskii and Oliutorskii have the most indigenous people who still use their traditional language in everyday life.

Well, a bit more of information. It says that they still use their traditional language in everyday life, this is crucial! So good news from Kamchatka!

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